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Casket Types and Considerations

Caskets are still a common sight at funerals, but before you decide, you should consider the casket types and the costs they will incur.

Caskets are not just for vampires, you know. When you’re being put into the ground for your last sleep, you might decide that you want to have something a little posher than your current king size bed like a nice lined-coffin all for yourself. Even though you’re dead, that’s no reason to be cheap, after all. If you’ve opted for burial insurance which covers the costs of a coffin, go for it. But if not, you might want to step back the think about what costs you might be putting your loved ones through. To avoid this, it is a good idea to preplan your funeral.

A Casket or a Coffin?

The words caskets and coffin are used interchangeably, though ‘coffin’ is losing a bit of its appeal… too creepy, right? These caskets can be made out of fiberglass, wood, or metal, and come with a variety of different liners and decorations. You can find a very ornate coffin or you might want something as simply as a wooden box that just gives your body a place to rest. Remember that style comes with a price tag: $2,000 and all the way up to $10,000 for some makes and models.

And let’s face it, if there was no burial insurance or a burial plan in place, you’re going to do to a funeral parlor and be shown a few models in order to make a choice. You won’t want to be cheap and pick the cheapest one, but that is still one that is generally overpriced. Instead, you need to ask the funeral director where their discount caskets are as you should be able to find something for less than $1,000. No need for them to scrape you for every penny in your time of grieving.

Rent a Coffin?

Or you might want to look into renting a coffin for the wake and then bury the deceased in a plain box. After all, the deceased isn’t really going to get to enjoy the satin pillow or lining. Many funeral homes will offer this service, and if one doesn’t, go somewhere else.

Should you have a casket? That’s really up to you and to your funeral plan. Most times, they can be too large an expense for people. For example, you might want your family to have a big party with the money you’ve left them not pay for a casket that cost more than your first car (and doesn’t reach 60 in less than 4 seconds).